The Catholic University of America

March 7, 2006

America's Unrealized Broadband Potential to be Discussed at CUA Law School Symposium

The country that invented the Internet currently ranks 13th in the world in broadband deployment, according to recent studies. Large swaths of the United States, primarily in poor, rural and underserved areas, still lack access to high-speed Internet service. This failure to fully deliver on the promise of broadband has long-term implications for America's economic health and global competitiveness.

Why America has slipped and what to do about it are the subjects of a daylong symposium on Tuesday, March 28, 2006, from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Walter A. Slowinski Courtroom of The Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law.

The symposium, "Bringing America up to Speed: Delivering on Our Broadband Future Without Sacrificing Local Identity," will draw together dozens of leading experts in the field of high-speed communications to discuss, dissect and debate the major policy issues surrounding universal broadband access. Co-sponsored by the law school's CommLaw Conspectus: Journal of Communications Law and Policy and the Institute for Communications Law Studies, the event will feature a keynote address from John Kneuer, deputy assistant secretary for the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. In addition, Michael Calabrese of the New America Foundation will debate Thomas Hazlett, professor of law and economics at the George Mason University School of Law, about the role of wireless spectrum in broadband proliferation. Other panels and presenters will examine the policies that have caused the United States to fall behind other countries, as well as scrutinize proposals that aim to restore the United States to a position of preeminence.

For the complete program and link to live Web cast, visit: law.cua.edu.

The event is free and open to the public. Media coverage is welcomed.

MEDIA: For more information or to make arrangements for coverage, contact Tom Haederle in the Law School's Office of Public Affairs by calling 202-319-5438 or e-mail: haederel@law.edu

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Media contact(s):
· Chris Harrison, CUA Office of Public Affairs, 202-319-5600, harrisoc@cua.edu
· Katie Lee, CUA Office of Public Affairs, 202-319-5600, leect@cua.edu