The Catholic University of America

May 30, 2008

CUA to Offer New Masters' Programs in Fall 2008
Architecture and Planning School and Metropolitan College Expand Offerings

Deans Randall Ott of the School of Architecture and Planning (left) and Sara Thompson of Metropolitan College (right) look over a new program brochure with CUA Provost James Brennan. CUA will unveil three new programs in the two schools this fall.
Starting this fall, The Catholic University of America will offer three new masters' programs. All of the programs are aimed at working professionals wishing to further their education, with most classes taking place in the evenings.

The new programs will include:

Master of Science in Management at Metropolitan College - focusing on the concepts, principles and issues faced by managers in all types of organizations.

Master of City and Regional Planning at the School of Architecture and Planning - linking design with policy to assist planners in the stewardship of built, natural and cultural environments.

Master of Science in Sustainable Design at the School of Architecture and Planning - preparing architects and designers to assume a personal responsibility for the welfare of the world through the stewardship of social, natural and built environments.

"We have carefully studied market trends, and these programs represent career paths that are growing in the greater DC region, so that individuals interested in enhancing their credentials will realize a pay off as they invest in their future," says CUA Provost James Brennan. "These three programs are the first of 12 specific new masters-level programs that we will be rolling out at CUA over the next three years. We intend all of them to be accessible to working adults who lead busy lives."

The Master of Science in Management (M.S.M.) program combines a strong academic foundation with practical knowledge and skills in management. The degree should have broad appeal, says Sara Thompson, dean of Metropolitan College. "About a fifth of the 25 fastest-growing jobs in D.C. are in management and business-related occupations," she says. "The M.S.M. would be excellent preparation for these positions."

The program requires about 22 months to complete and offers two concentrations - leadership and professional communication. Classes meet in the evenings and the schedule is tailored to meet the needs of students pursuing the program on a year-round, part-time basis with breaks in the late summer and late December. There is also an accelerated program for individuals who already have 60 college credits and choose to complete their bachelor's degree at Metropolitan College in two years, and then the Master of Science in Management program in one year.

Through the Master of City and Regional Planning program, students will be prepared to create a better built environment based on sustainable design and planning principles. The program will integrate planning history, theory, practice, zoning and legal aspects, land use, transportation, and analytical methods.

The program stresses the larger issues of city zoning and development - for instance, how to integrate transit and transportation issues, where parks and schools ought to be and how they should be spaced.

Randall Ott, dean of the architecture and planning school, says that towns are beginning to realize that perhaps developments with cul-de-sacs are not the most efficient designs. Cities are looking for young planners who can look at things in a new way - integrating mass transit and bike paths and building town homes and condos that are more space and energy efficient.

Building on the School of Architecture and Planning's mission statement of stewardship is the Master of Science in Sustainable Design, one of only a few such masters' programs in the country.

The two-semester program includes courses that explore greenhouse gas emissions and zero-energy design, embodied energy (the energy needed to manufacture and transport a product), Life Cycle Analysis (the environmental impact of a product's existence), national and international sustainability rating systems, water conservation and management, and low-energy building materials.

"There is great interest in both fields of study as they are increasingly relevant in today's society," says Ott about the two new masters' programs. "Each program emphasizes sustainability at varying scales to show it in a wider context - buildings, regions, cultures, etc. - and also covers the ethical dimensions of sustainability. I would be thrilled to have students who want to get both degrees because they work so well together."

For example, building condominium and apartment complexes with retail space on the first floor is not only effective from a city planning perspective, but is also sustainable design, as it saves residents from having to drive across town for goods and services.

For more information on admission to the Master of Science in Management program, visit http://metro.cua.edu/masters or contact Scott E. Battle, associate dean of Metropolitan College, at 202-319-5808 or battles@cua.edu.

For more information on admission to CUA's graduate programs in architecture, visit http://architecture.cua.edu/academicprograms/gradadmissions.cfm. For more information on admission to the Master of City and Regional Planning program, contact program director Hazel Ruth Edwards, associate professor of architecture and planning, at edwardsh@cua.edu.

For more information on the Master of Science in Sustainable Design, contact program director Chris Grech, associate professor of architecture and planning, at Grech@cua.edu.

MEDIA: For more information, contact Katie Lee or Mary McCarthy at 202-319-5600.

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