[CUA Office of Public Affairs]

                                                                        Oct. 25, 2005

                                                                                   

CUA Expert John Kenneth White

Available to Discuss

Bush Administration’s Troubles

 

John Kenneth White, a presidential scholar and professor of politics at The Catholic University of America, is available to discuss the issues he thinks have put the Bush presidency on “life support.”

 

White has analyzed recent polling figures dating back to the Truman administration to support his thesis about the declining Bush presidency in a recent paper, “A Presidency on Life Support,” which appeared in The Polling Report (view at: http://pollingreport.com/whitejk.htm).

 

“This administration is going down the tubes faster than you can say ‘indictment,’” White says. “President Bush can’t change the subject – from the war in Iraq, the economy and gas prices, doubts about his most recent Supreme Court nominee, his stalled Social Security and tax reform plans, and now what look like impending indictments of members of his administration. Presidents who can’t change the subject from such large issues are doomed to failure in the public opinion sense.”

 

White, a frequent commentator for print and broadcast media, can provide insight on the presidency and the impact of values, including moral and Catholic values, on the American electorate. Author of “The Values Divide: American Politics and Culture in Transition,” he works extensively with international pollster John Zogby. He has coined the phrase “E pluribus duo,” to describe the United States’ political polarization into two competing political camps.

 

For a copy of “A Presidency on Life Support” or to contact White for interviews, call the CUA Office of Public Affairs at 202-319-5600 or contact White directly by phone at 202-319-6136 or by e-mail at white@cua.edu.

 

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Revised: 10/25/2005

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The Catholic University of America,
Office of Public Affairs.