[CUA Office of Public Affairs]

Real Christmas Trees A Gift To Earth

 


 

Among the ecological myths of Christmas tree buying is the one claiming that artificial trees save live trees and thus help the environment. Not so, says Kevin Forbes, professor of business and economics at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.

"Ecologically, real Christmas trees are better for the earth and for people than artificial ones. About 1 million acres of land are set aside for the growing of Christmas trees. Each acre provides the daily oxygen requirements of 18 people," says Forbes.

"For every real Christmas tree harvested, two or three seedlings are planted in its place. And real Christmas trees are a renewable, recyclable resource."

Many communities collect and recycle real Christmas trees, chipping the trunk and branches to be used as mulch for gardens and parks. Pine bark mulch protects plant roots while preventing weeds from growing, then decomposes, providing nutrients the plants need to thrive.

Christmas tree farms have an aesthetic value as well, say Forbes, a resident of Montgomery County, Maryland. "When we buy real Christmas trees, we’re helping keep land devoted to growing trees rather than being plowed under or used for building sites."

 

For information on contacting Professor Forbes, please call or e-mail Carol Casey, Office of Public Affairs, The Catholic University of America, 202-319-5600; caseyc@cua.edu.

 

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Revised: December 16, 1998

All contents copyright © 1998.
The Catholic University of America,
Office of Public Affairs.

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Revised: June 8, 1998

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