The Catholic University of America

Feb. 1, 2007

Engineering Faculty Awarded $1.5 Million in Grants

National Science Foundation Recognizes Two Professors for Early Career Work

Four members of the faculty of The Catholic University of America's School of Engineering have been awarded grants from the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service in excess of $1.5 million. The awards include two NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program awards.

"The School of Engineering is thrilled to have two members of our faculty distinguished for their work at such an early age in their careers by winning the NSF CAREER awards," said Charles Nguyen, dean of the engineering school. "They have joined a team of cutting-edge scientists, as evidenced by other grants recently awarded to their colleagues."

Lu Sun, associate professor of civil engineering, has been awarded a five-year, $410,000 NSF CAREER award to study the effects of vehicle traffic on highway design. Otto Wilson, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, has been awarded a five-year, $450,000 NSF CAREER award, titled "Bone Inspiration in Research and Education." Wilson will use the unique structure and function of bone to develop materials to stimulate bone healing and modeling at the whole tissue, cell and molecular levels.

The NSF CAREER award seeks to honor young scientists whose activities best integrate the realms of research and education, building the basis for long-term contributions to their fields. It is considered the foundation's most prestigious award in early career development.

Two other engineering faculty members, Phillip Regalia, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and Peter Lum, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, recently received separate grants from the NSF and Veterans Affairs, respectively, totaling almost $700,000.

Regalia has been awarded an NSF award for research totaling $120,000. The three-year grant, titled "MUCHO: Two problems in Multi-User Communications for High Occupancy channels" will study the specific problems created by an overcrowding of modern wireless devices sharing limited wavelengths.

Lum has been awarded a three-year, $562,000 grant from the Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service to further develop neurorehabilitation abilities in stroke victims. The grant, titled "Extension of the MIME robotic system for stroke rehabilitation," will work to improve arm function following a stroke.

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Media contact(s):
· Chris Harrison, CUA Office of Public Affairs, 202-319-5600, harrisoc@cua.edu
· Katie Lee, CUA Office of Public Affairs, 202-319-5600, leect@cua.edu